From work to home, a lesson learned

I was just browsing Beehooved and saw the latest post from Matt Prince where he was talking about how he maximizes a full 24-hour work day. The part that suck out to me:

I have three potential answers when my wife asks me how my day was: Good, fine or sucked. Unless unordinary circumstances apply, none of those answers are followed up with supporting detail.  No need to relive my hard days work. I was there. I know what happened. This time saver is more mental than anything. Knowing I am 100% present when I walk through my front door means I can devote my energy to other things, like being a good husband and stuff.

 

That really hit me. I complain, brag, elaborate, etc. on my day all the time, but it’s not really necessary. I’m sure Jarrett isn’t always interested in everything (just the truth!) I’m doing so there’s really no need to keep discussing it. Matt is right when he said there’s no need to relive hard days at work. When you walk out the door, let it go.

I get to work at about 8:15 every morning (about an hour or more before everyone else does) so I can leave right at 5 p.m. to start my long journey of an hour and a half home. It’s really important to me to maximize my hours at work so I don’t have to stay late all the time. I value my time at home with my boyfriend and Lanie (my #PRdog) very much. 

It’s not that I’m not willing to work longer hours, but why do that when I can get my work done during my hours? This is just my experience. 

I also disconnect on the weekend as much as possible. Ariana Huffington said, “If we cannot disconnect, we cannot lead.” She, as well as Steve Jobs and Bill Gates, are known to disconnect for a while to come back refreshed.

At The Huffington Post, no one is expected to answer email after hours or over the weekend. “Ninety nine percent of the time it’s not urgent and to create a culture where you are constantly plugged in and expected to be always-on is to create a culture of a burnout,” said Huffington. “Creating the culture of burnout is opposite to creating a culture of sustainable creativity. This is something that needs to be taught in business schools. This mentality needs to be introduced as a leadership and performance-enhancing tool.”

Don’t burn yourself out and don’t stress yourself out. I think that’s one of the hardest lessons for new professionals to learn since we, typically, put in more hours and do more of the “grunt work.” 

One last thing: “We walk through life feeling like we are running out of time. It’s a terrible way to live your life,” says Arianna Huffington.

Take time to SLOW DOWN. That’s one thing about living in New York, people just have to go go go go go go go. They can’t even wait a few seconds to walk or can’t wait to push the next person out of the way to get on the subway. Everyone just needs to calm down. A few seconds isn’t going to wreck your day. Take more time to breathe and relax.

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I would love to hear from you: How is your work / life integration? What are your tips for balancing the two?

14 thoughts on “From work to home, a lesson learned

  1. Matt hit the nail on the head with what he said.

    I think we’re all guilty of complaining and elaborating about our days even when it’s over. When you drag it home with you it tends to muddle what’s going on around you. I’ve recently applied the principle of “good, fine and sucked,” and I’ve found myself more refreshed and less stressed to handle the next day’s workload.

    Something helpful is to sit down for a calm, quiet dinner. Disconnect from all media sources and focus on who is around you.

    1. Thanks for reading Ben!

      I absolutely agree with you. Those words are just fine to sum up a day and can close the door for the next day. I love the quiet dinners where there is NO technology around me so I can just focus on my friends and family.

  2. Matt hit the nail on the head with what he said.
    I think we’re all guilty of complaining and elaborating about our days even when it’s over. When you drag it home with you it tends to muddle what’s going on around you. I’ve recently applied the principle of “good, fine and sucked,” and I’ve found myself more refreshed and less stressed to handle the next day’s workload.
    Something helpful is to sit down for a calm, quiet dinner. Disconnect from all media sources and focus on who is around you.

    1. Thanks for reading Ben!
      I absolutely agree with you. Those words are just fine to sum up a day and can close the door for the next day. I love the quiet dinners where there is NO technology around me so I can just focus on my friends and family.

  3. Totally agree with both Matt and Ariana! I think it’s not only important to disconnect occasionally, but to find “me time” where you do things alone. Sometimes people get caught up in socializing or hanging with their partner that they don’t develop as individuals. For my “me time,” I read every night before bed. It’s something I love to do and it brings me peace.

    Great post, Lauren! I’m a big fan.

    1. Hi Meagan –

      I agree with you! I commute for so long every day and either spend time thinking or reading each way (1.5 hours = 3 total) and it’s really beneficial. I spend time with the bf and the dog at home so there’s not much alone time, but I do spend time with me on Sunday when Jarrett works too. Thanks for reading and commenting!

  4. Totally agree with both Matt and Ariana! I think it’s not only important to disconnect occasionally, but to find “me time” where you do things alone. Sometimes people get caught up in socializing or hanging with their partner that they don’t develop as individuals. For my “me time,” I read every night before bed. It’s something I love to do and it brings me peace.
    Great post, Lauren! I’m a big fan.

    1. Hi Meagan –
      I agree with you! I commute for so long every day and either spend time thinking or reading each way (1.5 hours = 3 total) and it’s really beneficial. I spend time with the bf and the dog at home so there’s not much alone time, but I do spend time with me on Sunday when Jarrett works too. Thanks for reading and commenting!

  5. This is a great post, Lauren. I couldn’t agree more. As a new professional, I’m learning these lessons everyday. Thanks for sharing!

  6. This is a great post, Lauren. I couldn’t agree more. As a new professional, I’m learning these lessons everyday. Thanks for sharing!

  7. I work from home a lot more than I should, but my boss and I have both decided recently that work is for the office unless it’s really, really urgent. The thing was, the work I did at home was easy tasks or things I enjoyed, so I didn’t think I would get burnt out. I was wrong, and realized that after about a year. If I’m bored, I’ll do parts of my job that I enjoy the most at home, but I no longer feel guilty if that doesn’t happen every night!

  8. I work from home a lot more than I should, but my boss and I have both decided recently that work is for the office unless it’s really, really urgent. The thing was, the work I did at home was easy tasks or things I enjoyed, so I didn’t think I would get burnt out. I was wrong, and realized that after about a year. If I’m bored, I’ll do parts of my job that I enjoy the most at home, but I no longer feel guilty if that doesn’t happen every night!

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