Top Political Posts Today: #DOMA, #Prop8, #SB5 and #StandWithWendy

So much has gone down over the past two days, so I wanted to highlight a few important articles with some important information essential to our understanding of what has happened with the Voting Rights Act, the Defense of Marriage Act, Proposition 8 and the Texas SB 5 bill that have closed 37/42 abortion clinics.

 

1. SCOTUS decision behind invalidating key parts of the Voting Rights Act:

After striking down essential parts of the VRA, “the decision will have immediate practical consequences. Texas announced shortly after the decision that a voter identification law that had been blocked would go into effect immediately, and that redistricting maps there would no longer need federal approval. Changes in voting procedures in the places that had been covered by the law, including ones concerning restrictions on early voting, will now be subject only to after-the-fact litigation.”

Read more: Supreme Court Invalidates Key Part of Voting Rights Act on The New York Times

 

2. What the VRA decision means for minorities and racism:

“Minority voting turnout and registration rates “approach parity” in these places precisely because the V.R.A. serves as a deterrent to and recourse for voting discrimination. The violent subjugation of black voters in the South has all but vanished, but that overt kind of racism isn’t the best barometer of progress. Simple political interest—not raving negrophobic bigotry—has too often been enough to inspire efforts to diminish black turnout.”

Read more: The Voting Rights Act: An End to Racism by Judicial Order on The New Yorker

 

3. Texas and their disgraceful treatment of Wendy Davis and extreme attempts to force control over the entire state

In order to fight this anti-abortion bill, known as SB 5, and under Texas’ strict parliamentary rules, “Davis was required to speak continuously and only on the topic of the bill the entire time. She couldn’t take breaks to eat, take a sip of water or go to the bathroom. She could not lean against anything for support. If Davis broke any of these rules, the filibuster would die and SB 5 would become law.”

What a fighter. She stood up for women’s rights along with thousands of supporters. She really fought and WON.

Read more: Abortion Rights Under Fire: Why Wendy Davis’ Filibuster Matters on Rolling Stone

BONUS: What Wendy Davis Stood For on The New Yorker

Wendy Davis

4. The entire live blog of the filibuster by Wendy Davis and what went down while every major outlet didn’t cover the story

The vote for the bill was taken after midnight, but Republicans admittedly tried to change the time stamps on the website to reflect it was taken before the midnight deadline. This was called out immediately.

“The initial time stamp on the Capitol website and on Senate documents placed the vote at 12:02 or 12:03 on June 26. But then someone mysteriously changed the time stamp to make it appear SB 5 passed before the deadline (see the post below for photographic evidence). The time stamp evidence, circulated on Twitter, eventually forced GOP leaders to admit defeat, at least for tonight.”

Read more: Live Blog: Senate Filibuster on Anti-Abortion Bill on Texas Observer

Image from Twitter [click for link]
Image from Twitter showing the time stamp changes [click for link]

5. DOMA struck down by SCOTUS

Here’s some history:

“United States v. Windsor concerns Edith Windsor, who was widowed when her wife Thea Spyer died in 2009. Windsor and Spyer were married in 2007 in Canada after being partners for 40 years. Windsor was forced to pay $363,053 in estate tax on Spyer’s estate, which she argues she would not have to pay if she had been Spyer’s husband. Thus, she claims, the Defense of Marriage Act, which prevents her from being considered Spyer’s spouse for the purposes of federal taxes, literally cost her $363,053.”

What does this mean for everyone? “That would mean most legally married same-sex couples, regardless of where they live, are entitled to spousal benefits…. This does open the door for  bi-national same-sex couples to be treated equally under the law.”

Read more of the history and the future: The Supreme Court struck down part of DOMA. Here’s what you need to know. via The Washington Post

Edith Windsor after her victory via Getty Images
Edith Windsor after her victory via Getty Images

 

6. Prop 8 dismissed

“The case was sent back to the court with orders to dismiss. The result is that the lower court ruling which struck down Prop 8 remains in place – it’s a procedural victory applicable only in California: same-sex marriage can resume in California.”

Read more: What Prop 8 Ruling Means for California on The Wall Street Journal

 

____________________________

Well we definitely have some victories above, BUT we still have a long ways to go for equality across the country for women, minorities, gays and basically anyone who isn’t a straight, while male.

KEEP MOVING FORWARD and keep spreading the message.

#loveislove #equalityforall #mybodymychoice

 

2 thoughts on “Top Political Posts Today: #DOMA, #Prop8, #SB5 and #StandWithWendy

  1. Reblogged this on Simon Oh and commented:
    In the last 48 hours, we have seen some of the most important decisions the Supreme Court of the United States has handed down in recent years, enough to have great implications for our country’s future. My good friend Lauren Gray sums up everything that’s happened this week from the Voting Rights Act to DOMA.

  2. Reblogged this on Simon Oh and commented:In the last 48 hours, we have seen some of the most important decisions the Supreme Court of the United States has handed down in recent years, enough to have great implications for our country’s future. My good friend Lauren Gray sums up everything that’s happened this week from the Voting Rights Act to DOMA.

Share your thoughts:

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s