Breaking up with Facebook.

I know I’m not the only one who has noticed the seemingly insane emphasis on Facebook lately for people and businesses. This is not a hate post on Facebook, but there are a few things that need to change.

 

Click image for original location.

 

1. Stop putting so much life emphasis on Facebook. It shocks me how many people get so offended or upset when this person comments on a post or “why can’t we be in a relationship on Facebook” or “why didn’t you comment on this?” It is ridiculous. Another thing: status wars. People need to learn to cut the crap and grow up.

 

2. Facebook is not the end all be all. Facebook is not the solution for every single company, consultant, small business, etc. It is a *tactic or tool* for a strategy, not an overall solution. Your company still needs to have a website. When you have a commercial, list your WEBSITE, not your Facebook page.

 

3. Disconnect Facebook and Twitter. Have I done this? Yes. Was it a mistake? Yes. Facebook and Twitter audiences are not the same and the sooner people and businesses start realizing this, the better off we will all be. They are completely different platforms! Take the time to update them separately and appropriately for each of them.

 

4. Too much time is spent on Facebook. If you are losing sleep on Facebook or having anxiety because you’ve been away from Facebook, that’s a problem! Facebook Addiction Disorder (FAD) has been identified as a new mental health disorder. Yes, I’m serious.

 

5. Learn how to use Facebook as a tool, not just for personal reasons. I think a lot of students and even professionals spend SO much time on Facebook that they forget it can be a valuable tool for their business. Not THE tool, but a tool [as I said above]. Learn how to utilize it as a tool for your future career! Dive into Facebook Insights and other Facebook measurements.

 

Click image for original location.

 

Now, I can complain about it all I want, but what about some action?? Well here’s what I did about it:

 

A. I went through my friends and deleted 400+ people. If you weren’t adding value to my news feed, if we really didn’t talk much, if I really didn’t know you well, etc. I deleted you. It wasn’t for personal reasons, I was just cleaning up and keeping my Facebook more personal.

B. I stopped posting so much. I used to post status after status about feelings, daily happenings, etc. and now I don’t post as much. Do I still have status updates and such? Yes, but I’ve been posting more links and other helpful content.

C. Joined more conversation via the #PRstudchat, PRSSA and #u30pro groups. Instead of asking things and such on my own wall, these groups are GREAT resources for help, advice and content.

D. I’m researching more analytics and measurement statistics for Facebook. I’m trying to learn more about how to use it as a tool for my future career and trying to spend less meaningless time on it doing really… nothing!

 

What do you think are some other problems with Facebook? Have you changed any of your Facebook habits?

 

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Must read posts:

Five clues that you are addicted to Facebook – via CNN

Drawing a line between Facebook addiction and proper utilization – via Kate Malinoski

 





16 thoughts on “Breaking up with Facebook.

  1. Honestly, the only reason I am on Facebook is because a couple places I hope to work/intern with require it. Otherwise, I wouldn’t be on it at all! I find that the people I am friends with on Facebook are more personal connections — they aren’t interested in links that I may post! I like, also, that I don’t have to hear things like you mentioned above when people get upset over Facebook things. So silly!

    Thanks for another great post πŸ™‚

    1. Hi Melissa!

      If I didn’t work with Facebook everyday, I don’t know if I would have a profile on Facebook either. The drama that constantly surrounds this website is incredulous to me. I love the Facebook groups, which is where I mostly post now anyways.

      -Lauren

  2. Honestly, the only reason I am on Facebook is because a couple places I hope to work/intern with require it. Otherwise, I wouldn’t be on it at all! I find that the people I am friends with on Facebook are more personal connections — they aren’t interested in links that I may post! I like, also, that I don’t have to hear things like you mentioned above when people get upset over Facebook things. So silly!
    Thanks for another great post πŸ™‚

    1. Hi Melissa!
      If I didn’t work with Facebook everyday, I don’t know if I would have a profile on Facebook either. The drama that constantly surrounds this website is incredulous to me. I love the Facebook groups, which is where I mostly post now anyways.
      -Lauren

  3. Am I at a disadvantage because I don’t have a Facebook account? The more Facebook horror stories (there’s a Facebook Addiction Disorder?!) I read or hear about, the more it turns me off signing up with it.

    Don’t get me wrong, I think Facebook is a fantastic tool to connect and network, but personally I think having my LinkedIn, Twitter and blog is enough at this point.

    I don’t know, maybe I’m completely wrong and I’ll end up creating an account 10 years after everybody else, but for now – no Facebook for me.

    1. Hao,

      I am extremely respectful of your decision and really admire you for it. Some people say they “couldn’t live without Facebook” and that is ridiculous. It is a fantastic took for connecting, but Twitter and LinkedIn are more valuable for that.

      I’m proud of you, you don’t need one!

      -Lauren

  4. Am I at a disadvantage because I don’t have a Facebook account? The more Facebook horror stories (there’s a Facebook Addiction Disorder?!) I read or hear about, the more it turns me off signing up with it.
    Don’t get me wrong, I think Facebook is a fantastic tool to connect and network, but personally I think having my LinkedIn, Twitter and blog is enough at this point.
    I don’t know, maybe I’m completely wrong and I’ll end up creating an account 10 years after everybody else, but for now – no Facebook for me.

    1. Hao,
      I am extremely respectful of your decision and really admire you for it. Some people say they “couldn’t live without Facebook” and that is ridiculous. It is a fantastic took for connecting, but Twitter and LinkedIn are more valuable for that.
      I’m proud of you, you don’t need one!
      -Lauren

  5. Lauren — this is a great post. I especially appreciate your suggestion that Twitter and Facebook are two different platforms and should be treated us such. In PR, being genuine is so important, but when we connect these two unrelated platforms, we show our audience that we don’t care enough to specialize our posts to two separate mediums…big mistake! Thanks for pointing this out.

  6. Lauren — this is a great post. I especially appreciate your suggestion that Twitter and Facebook are two different platforms and should be treated us such. In PR, being genuine is so important, but when we connect these two unrelated platforms, we show our audience that we don’t care enough to specialize our posts to two separate mediums…big mistake! Thanks for pointing this out.

  7. […] I have a relationship with in real life. (Lauren Gray reflects these sentiments in her post, “Breaking up with Facebook.”) So, if this is the case, why are PR pros using one update for both platforms? Photo […]

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