Watching Your Social Media Footprint

There are tons of blogposts out there about social media and how to act on social media and this is just my opinion.

When you first sign up for Facebook, Twitter, a blog, a website, etc. you immediately start leaving a footprint.

Did you know every single tweet is saved in the Library of Congress? Of course, “only tweets from public Twitter feeds will be included, not those that have been set as private.” Read about it here: http://bit.ly/c4TLGC

When you start looking for a job, whether it is on social media or not, the first place a future employer starts looking for information about you is the internet. They look through your Facebook, Twitter, website, etc. In one of my first interviews, my interviewer told me he had been following me for a while on Twitter and had been looking through my tweets, I had no idea.

Of course, that didn’t really bother me because I keep my tweets pretty professional with a little bit of personality and my personal interests mixed in. I never really had anything terrible on my Facebook, but I’ve cleaned that up too and added my professional sites to it as well.

What is an employer going to see when they look at your page? If you are tweeting offensive things, things like “I ate a grilled cheese today,” misleading things, tons of profanity, tweets that bash people, etc. you are not going to look good to an employer.

Another tip: don’t tweet about hating social media or bashing social media if you are on any social media site because that’s pretty contradictory and someone might wonder why you’re on any social media site to begin with.

On Twitter, try to engage companies, other people and different Twitter chats in conversation so you are tweeting professionally and with other people. Get involved in your interests and your career, no matter what it is.  Here is a link to my favorite Twitter chats: http://bit.ly/g7Q3Xf and a link to all the documented Twitter chats: http://bit.ly/b2jErT.

I would also recommend watching what you post as status updates on LinkedIn, since it is a professional networking site.

Employers are out there looking. Do you really want something online that you post to jeopardize anything for your future? Think it over.

What kind of social media footprint are you leaving? What do you want to be known for?

 

 

 

More related links:

Social Media Footprint is the new resume: http://bit.ly/9ltUSp by @MichelleTripp

Job hunting? Watch what you tweet: http://bit.ly/3tt1Wq

7 Deadly Twitter sins: http://bit.ly/gslyv4 by @JessicaMalnik

7 Deadly Facebook sins: http://bit.ly/fTldhB by @JessicaMalnik

7 Deadly LinkedIn sins: http://bit.ly/f6QTZk by @JessicaMalnik

8 thoughts on “Watching Your Social Media Footprint

  1. I completely agree with this, we had a discussion about it in one of our seminars last week and nobody agreed with me! I couldn’t believe the future of PR sitting around me weren’t concerned with what they put online for everyone to see.

    1. Jessica that is very concerning that no one was agreeing with you! Honestly, maybe it would take something to happen to make them into believers, but let’s hope that doesn’t happen! I’m glad you are on the right page though!

      -Lauren

      1. I 100% agree – those that say they hate math or science have to think about what they’re saying in public to potential employers.

        I’ve also had potential employers say something to me about my use of profanity on Twitter. But, well, I don’t want to work with a puritanical company if they’re upset by a “fuck” or two.

        Plus I find it exciting that my random lyrics tweets will be in the Library of Congress. Let future generations revel in my genius.

      2. I agree 100 percent – and have had to have this talk with students I mentor who hate this or hate that on Twitter. Whatever, life is too short to hate anything. But students and people have to think about what they’re saying in public to potential employers.

        I’ve also had potential employers say something to me about my use of profanity on Twitter. But, well, I don’t want to work with a puritanical company if they’re upset by a “fuck” or two.

        Plus I find it exciting that my random lyrics tweets will be in the Library of Congress. Let future generations revel in my genius.

        1. Thank you Jeremy and I’m glad you agree. We all do have to watch what we say online, I agree.

          You can say what you want of course, I try not to cuss a lot! Thanks for reading and commenting!

  2. Hi Lauren… great post. I have a company named Social Media Footprints and my slogan is “What does your “social media footprint” say about you? So I’m sure it won’t come as a surprise that I agree with you 100%. But I have very close family members that cause me to scratch my head when I read some of their post on Facebook. I’ve concluded that we all use social media for different reasons … and it seems that people using it purely for social interaction are more concerned with sounding “in vogue” with their peers or gaining social approval. I don’t think they give much thought to the broader ramifications of how what they say may sound to a different audience. Hopefully they will come across a blog post like yours every now and then and take it seriously.

    Feel free to stop by my blog sometime… http://www.mysocialmediablog.com

    1. Hi William! I actually have been to your blog/website after I started thinking about what a social media footprint is and what we are leaving behind on social media.

      I hope people really take this seriously too, it’s something people need to know and remember. Thanks for reading and commenting!

      -Lauren

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