Professionalism of Twitter and Facebook?

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This is an I ask a few questions and you respond kind of post! I have a few questions about the professionalism of Twitter and Facebook.

Recently, a professor told me I should delete my Twitter feed from my LinkedIn account because it was “chatty” conversation more suitable for Facebook. First she said since I have a Facebook linke, I “don’t need Twitter.” Then she also told me to “eliminate the Facebook link” because “anyone can find you anyway.”

Honestly, I’m confused.

I did delete my Twitter feed from my LinkedIn account because I could see how it could clog up people’s feeds and because, while most of my tweets are professional, there is some conversation with others that might be considered “chatty.” Though, I never have tweets like “going to the bathroom” or any nonsense like that. Now, I only have a link to my Twitter and Facebook and not any kind of feeds.

There has also been some discussion in the #prstudchat’s LinkedIn group about separating Twitter accounts, one to be professional and one personal. I do not do a lot of personal tweeting so I just have one account and I also do not know a lot of people who have separate accounts.

I understand the need for two accounts if you have a business, company, organization, etc. and you want a separate personal account, but not sure about myself having two accounts.

I am questioning the professionalism of Facebook at all and if I should have a link because Facebook is very personal and not really for the professional world, unless you have a fan page or group page for your organization, brand, business, etc.

Do you think I should have a link to my Facebook on LinkedIn? Is Facebook professional at all?

What is your opinion on the professionalism of Twitter and if you need a personal Twitter account separate from a professional Twitter account?

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My Twitter: http://twitter.com/laurenkgray

My LinkedIn: http://www.linkedin.com/in/laurenkgray

42 thoughts on “Professionalism of Twitter and Facebook?

  1. I don’t think Facebook is a ‘professional’ enviornment for me. Its a lot of fun as I am ‘friends’ with people like my granddaughter, daughter and others who engage ‘lite & fun chatter’ when I

    Twitter however, is more professional for me. We are human, and I sometimes shift from professional content on Twitter but 90% of my content has professional overtones. I’ve learned a lot from the brilliant people I follow!

    Linkedin is a little boring although I sometimes respond to blogs from Groups I’ve joined. They are boring Groups! But they sounded like a good professional idea at first. lol

    Thanks for posting this thought-provoking blog. I enjoy following you and reading your content on Twitter. You have a GREAT future in PR ahead of you! I just know this!

    1. Thank you SO much Sonia! You are very encouraging! I think we agree about Facebook and Twitter. My Facebook isn’t very professional, it’s more about pictures and friends there.

      My Twitter I try to keep as professional as I can. I think that about 90% of my Twitter content is professional too. I’ve also learned A LOT from the brilliant people I follow!

      LinkedIn groups have gotten a LOT better since Twitter hashtags I follow have gotten LinkedIn groups like #blogchat, #prstudchat and even #u30pro! They usually have good convo there.

      Again, thank you so much for your positive comment and insight!

      1. Agreed. Facebook is for connecting with my university friends and staying in touch with high school contacts. It’s for posting pictures and staying up-to-date.

        Definitely a different environment when compared with LinkedIn (professional) or Twitter (new friends).

  2. I don’t think Facebook is a ‘professional’ enviornment for me. Its a lot of fun as I am ‘friends’ with people like my granddaughter, daughter and others who engage ‘lite & fun chatter’ when I
    Twitter however, is more professional for me. We are human, and I sometimes shift from professional content on Twitter but 90% of my content has professional overtones. I’ve learned a lot from the brilliant people I follow!
    Linkedin is a little boring although I sometimes respond to blogs from Groups I’ve joined. They are boring Groups! But they sounded like a good professional idea at first. lol
    Thanks for posting this thought-provoking blog. I enjoy following you and reading your content on Twitter. You have a GREAT future in PR ahead of you! I just know this!

    1. Thank you SO much Sonia! You are very encouraging! I think we agree about Facebook and Twitter. My Facebook isn’t very professional, it’s more about pictures and friends there.
      My Twitter I try to keep as professional as I can. I think that about 90% of my Twitter content is professional too. I’ve also learned A LOT from the brilliant people I follow!
      LinkedIn groups have gotten a LOT better since Twitter hashtags I follow have gotten LinkedIn groups like #blogchat, #prstudchat and even #u30pro! They usually have good convo there.
      Again, thank you so much for your positive comment and insight!

      1. Agreed. Facebook is for connecting with my university friends and staying in touch with high school contacts. It’s for posting pictures and staying up-to-date.
        Definitely a different environment when compared with LinkedIn (professional) or Twitter (new friends).

  3. Ooops! Paragraph # 1 last line should read ” Its a lot of fun as I am ‘friends’ with people like my granddaughter, daughter and others who engage ‘lite & fun chatter’ when I go there” (Now back to my distraction The US Open)

  4. I have my LinkedIn connected to my Twitter, but I control when my tweets get sent to my LinkedIn feed (it’s an option where you can use the hashtag #in). I find this helpful if I’m announcing a blog post or absolutely NEED something to show up on LinkedIn. Usually, if an employer/connection is interested, they’d check my twitter feed anyways.

    I don’t see Facebook as professional, but I still am mindful of what I post on it to a certain extent.

    Having separate twitter accounts is something I’m completely against unless you are the face of a business or brand. I view Twitter as a way to showcase both my professional and personal side; it’s supposed to make me look different from the rest of the pack. I’m not always going to be professional, and I’m not going to hide my personality, outside interests, or conversations with friends behind another name.

    The line between work and life is blurring for a lot of people our age. I don’t think it’s possible or preferable to separate my personal and professional life. Again, it’s just about being mindful of what you post and about being comfortable with ALL the content you’re showcasing online.

    Definitely an interesting topic!

    Tom Miesen
    @tmiesen

    1. After this topic surfaced, I too discovered the #in hashtag that sends tweets to LinkedIn. I am now using that to send tweets to LinkedIn instead of having my whole feed sent to LinkedIn.

      I also agree with you about showing your personality on your accounts and not having two separate accounts unless the other one is for a brand or business. I think some personal and professional separation is necessary though and we do need to be careful about what content we DO put online overall. Thanks for your input!

  5. I have my LinkedIn connected to my Twitter, but I control when my tweets get sent to my LinkedIn feed (it’s an option where you can use the hashtag #in). I find this helpful if I’m announcing a blog post or absolutely NEED something to show up on LinkedIn. Usually, if an employer/connection is interested, they’d check my twitter feed anyways.
    I don’t see Facebook as professional, but I still am mindful of what I post on it to a certain extent.
    Having separate twitter accounts is something I’m completely against unless you are the face of a business or brand. I view Twitter as a way to showcase both my professional and personal side; it’s supposed to make me look different from the rest of the pack. I’m not always going to be professional, and I’m not going to hide my personality, outside interests, or conversations with friends behind another name.
    The line between work and life is blurring for a lot of people our age. I don’t think it’s possible or preferable to separate my personal and professional life. Again, it’s just about being mindful of what you post and about being comfortable with ALL the content you’re showcasing online.
    Definitely an interesting topic!
    Tom Miesen
    @tmiesen

    1. After this topic surfaced, I too discovered the #in hashtag that sends tweets to LinkedIn. I am now using that to send tweets to LinkedIn instead of having my whole feed sent to LinkedIn.
      I also agree with you about showing your personality on your accounts and not having two separate accounts unless the other one is for a brand or business. I think some personal and professional separation is necessary though and we do need to be careful about what content we DO put online overall. Thanks for your input!

  6. I agree that Facebook tends to be more personal. For most of us that’s where we keep in touch with friends, most of who don’t care about the newest PR and SM trends we find fascinating. If I were to share interesting blog posts I read, or my own posts, on Facebook, especially with the same volume as I do on Twitter, my friends would hide me from their news feed so fast. Until more people start using Facebook as a professional platform, and adding a “friend” becomes less intimate than following someone on Twitter, it will probably remain for personal use only, at least on individual levels. Ultimately, my Twitter and Facebook audiences are just very different. What makes sense to share on one site doesn’t make sense on the other. That being said, I don’t think there’s any harm in having a Facebook link on your LinkedIn. If you have nothing to hide and your profile is fairly public it can give employers insight into your unique personality and go beyond your professional persona found on Twitter.

    Having two Twitter accounts is an interesting thought. For me personally, I don’t know enough people on a personal level to have a strictly personal Twitter account. This is a selfish outlook, but as a college senior I mainly use Twitter to learn from others. Sometimes I do engage in conversation with people which probably offers no value to my followers, but I’m building connections through those interactions. I think the occasional unprofessional tweet is ok as long as it showcases your personality. People are complex, and if we only ever tweeted out professional links we’d seem robotic, like Guy Kawasaki or Mashable. We’re building our personal brands, and without glimpses of our personalities that’s not possible.

    1. I REALLY love your response! You basically sound like me!

      I don’t think Facebook will ever really be “professional” either and my FB and Twitter audiences are VERY different too. Most of my PR and SM friends @WCU (I’m a college senior too) do not have a Twitter nor do they see the usefulness of it. If I posted HALF of my Twitter feed to Facebook I would definitely be unfriended and have my feed hidden too!

      I also use Twitter to learn from others and absolutely adore the people I’m following! I have learned so much! It is important to show personality and not only tweet links, engage in conversation!

      Thanks so much for your response!

  7. I agree that Facebook tends to be more personal. For most of us that’s where we keep in touch with friends, most of who don’t care about the newest PR and SM trends we find fascinating. If I were to share interesting blog posts I read, or my own posts, on Facebook, especially with the same volume as I do on Twitter, my friends would hide me from their news feed so fast. Until more people start using Facebook as a professional platform, and adding a “friend” becomes less intimate than following someone on Twitter, it will probably remain for personal use only, at least on individual levels. Ultimately, my Twitter and Facebook audiences are just very different. What makes sense to share on one site doesn’t make sense on the other. That being said, I don’t think there’s any harm in having a Facebook link on your LinkedIn. If you have nothing to hide and your profile is fairly public it can give employers insight into your unique personality and go beyond your professional persona found on Twitter.
    Having two Twitter accounts is an interesting thought. For me personally, I don’t know enough people on a personal level to have a strictly personal Twitter account. This is a selfish outlook, but as a college senior I mainly use Twitter to learn from others. Sometimes I do engage in conversation with people which probably offers no value to my followers, but I’m building connections through those interactions. I think the occasional unprofessional tweet is ok as long as it showcases your personality. People are complex, and if we only ever tweeted out professional links we’d seem robotic, like Guy Kawasaki or Mashable. We’re building our personal brands, and without glimpses of our personalities that’s not possible.

    1. I REALLY love your response! You basically sound like me!
      I don’t think Facebook will ever really be “professional” either and my FB and Twitter audiences are VERY different too. Most of my PR and SM friends @WCU (I’m a college senior too) do not have a Twitter nor do they see the usefulness of it. If I posted HALF of my Twitter feed to Facebook I would definitely be unfriended and have my feed hidden too!
      I also use Twitter to learn from others and absolutely adore the people I’m following! I have learned so much! It is important to show personality and not only tweet links, engage in conversation!
      Thanks so much for your response!

    1. That is very true. I think businesses will go look at your Facebook and Twitter anyways though, from what I’ve heard from professors and other professionals at conferences and such. I’m hoping my Twitter and FB won’t cost me a job one day, I keep them both pretty clean!

      Thanks for your input and different perspective though!

    1. That is very true. I think businesses will go look at your Facebook and Twitter anyways though, from what I’ve heard from professors and other professionals at conferences and such. I’m hoping my Twitter and FB won’t cost me a job one day, I keep them both pretty clean!
      Thanks for your input and different perspective though!

  8. I’m in the same spot as you: “I understand the need for two accounts if you have a business, company, organization, etc. and you want a separate personal account, but not sure about myself having two accounts.” I will continue to have my account and then tweet separately, i.e. NOT my account, for the company. But we have plans that will most likely require others to have two accounts if they’d like.

    You’ve already got great feedback above – I’ll stick with “however comfortable you are in those arenas, do and try as much as you want”. If you find over-sharing in one space is too much for two accounts, then drop it, no harm no foul. All of the above channels have their pros and cons for both professional and personal, and it’s hard for me to make any blanket statements on what anyone should or shouldn’t do.

    1. Thanks for your comment! I think companies should definitely have separate accounts for personal and professional tweets, but I understand your comment about “it’s hard for me to make any blanket statements” because I don’t think there is definitely a “right or wrong” here, just personal preference.

  9. I’m in the same spot as you: “I understand the need for two accounts if you have a business, company, organization, etc. and you want a separate personal account, but not sure about myself having two accounts.” I will continue to have my account and then tweet separately, i.e. NOT my account, for the company. But we have plans that will most likely require others to have two accounts if they’d like.
    You’ve already got great feedback above – I’ll stick with “however comfortable you are in those arenas, do and try as much as you want”. If you find over-sharing in one space is too much for two accounts, then drop it, no harm no foul. All of the above channels have their pros and cons for both professional and personal, and it’s hard for me to make any blanket statements on what anyone should or shouldn’t do.

    1. Thanks for your comment! I think companies should definitely have separate accounts for personal and professional tweets, but I understand your comment about “it’s hard for me to make any blanket statements” because I don’t think there is definitely a “right or wrong” here, just personal preference.

  10. Your post reminded me of a discussion we had in my PR class about having twitter accounts that are “locked” and one that’s more professional. My instructor said she had at least 3 accounts, which seemed ridiculous to me. Personally I don’t see the need to have a private account – no one needs to know that kind of stuff anyway. Twitter is great for conversations, and I can see wanting to discuss something private, but that’s what direct messages are for. I like what you said, you definitely shouldn’t be tweeting things such as “I’m going to the bathroom!” Things can follow you online whether it’s private or not. Great post; it’s led to some pretty good comments to read!

    1. First, the idea of 3 accounts is VERY ridiculous! I agree.

      The “locked” accounts is another topic (probably for one of my upcoming blog posts) I want to discuss about how you cannot engage people whose Twitter accounts are “locked.” because I can’t see what they are saying and they cannot participate in chats at all! Social media is… SOCIAL! You are there to talk and get involved in conversations and you are right, private convo is what DMs are for.

      Thank you for your input and your positive comment! I’m glad you liked the post AND got info from the comments too!

  11. Your post reminded me of a discussion we had in my PR class about having twitter accounts that are “locked” and one that’s more professional. My instructor said she had at least 3 accounts, which seemed ridiculous to me. Personally I don’t see the need to have a private account – no one needs to know that kind of stuff anyway. Twitter is great for conversations, and I can see wanting to discuss something private, but that’s what direct messages are for. I like what you said, you definitely shouldn’t be tweeting things such as “I’m going to the bathroom!” Things can follow you online whether it’s private or not. Great post; it’s led to some pretty good comments to read!

    1. First, the idea of 3 accounts is VERY ridiculous! I agree.
      The “locked” accounts is another topic (probably for one of my upcoming blog posts) I want to discuss about how you cannot engage people whose Twitter accounts are “locked.” because I can’t see what they are saying and they cannot participate in chats at all! Social media is… SOCIAL! You are there to talk and get involved in conversations and you are right, private convo is what DMs are for.
      Thank you for your input and your positive comment! I’m glad you liked the post AND got info from the comments too!

  12. I tried not to read too much of the comments (so I don’t give a swayed opinion, lol). Facebook isn’t really considered a professional realm, and it actually started as a college social network (yes, I was part of the original membership waaay back when it started as college-only). But since then, FB has “embraced” the culture of communication and learned that people create their own communication opportunities and form their own circles. It (along with other networks) has further embraced the business aspect by recognizing that people are talking about services, products, wants, & needs regardless of the platform. I have always been pretty cautious about what I post on FB or Twitter, MySpace, LinkedIn and such – even before I owned my own company and even before businesses caught on to how SM can influence. Why? Because it is so easy for people to see us in a fun way and assume that we are unprofessional and careless – and they forget that they take some of the same crazy pictures (et al). I do have a few different Twitter accounts, but that’s just based upon the different markets. However, one account does allow me to be a heck of a lot more personal and real – because of the industry, and I did start it as a personal account with a unique interest – that eventually evolved into a personal AND business voice (@CoffeeKween). Now (to finally get to my point – lol), although FB can be very personal as it started that way, it’s a great place to make business connections – as I have made several there. I don’t necessarily link my different accounts for one sole reason: the different social networks have slightly different tones of communication, and the things I have to say are tailored to where it is – which may be different for you – you just have to understand the response that you receive within the different SM platforms. I still have my personal FB page (as well as several fan pages) and am very personal with my own account – but I handle it just like I handle my physical personal life – don’t let things get out of hand, and you’ll be able to maintain your personal brand and your reputation. With that said, goodbye! ~@KBCSolutions~

    1. I’m glad you didn’t read other comments before and get swayed in your opinion! I do agree that the different social media sites have different tones and audiences, especially for me! I like the separation of accounts for business vs a personal person from the company but I don’t need separate accounts right now because I do keep my Twitter 90% professional. I try to keep my Facebook as clean as possible so people don’t see me as “careless” or anything! I’m trying to keep that positive image up!

      Thank you so much for your comment and input!

  13. I tried not to read too much of the comments (so I don’t give a swayed opinion, lol). Facebook isn’t really considered a professional realm, and it actually started as a college social network (yes, I was part of the original membership waaay back when it started as college-only). But since then, FB has “embraced” the culture of communication and learned that people create their own communication opportunities and form their own circles. It (along with other networks) has further embraced the business aspect by recognizing that people are talking about services, products, wants, & needs regardless of the platform. I have always been pretty cautious about what I post on FB or Twitter, MySpace, LinkedIn and such – even before I owned my own company and even before businesses caught on to how SM can influence. Why? Because it is so easy for people to see us in a fun way and assume that we are unprofessional and careless – and they forget that they take some of the same crazy pictures (et al). I do have a few different Twitter accounts, but that’s just based upon the different markets. However, one account does allow me to be a heck of a lot more personal and real – because of the industry, and I did start it as a personal account with a unique interest – that eventually evolved into a personal AND business voice (@CoffeeKween). Now (to finally get to my point – lol), although FB can be very personal as it started that way, it’s a great place to make business connections – as I have made several there. I don’t necessarily link my different accounts for one sole reason: the different social networks have slightly different tones of communication, and the things I have to say are tailored to where it is – which may be different for you – you just have to understand the response that you receive within the different SM platforms. I still have my personal FB page (as well as several fan pages) and am very personal with my own account – but I handle it just like I handle my physical personal life – don’t let things get out of hand, and you’ll be able to maintain your personal brand and your reputation. With that said, goodbye! ~@KBCSolutions~

    1. I’m glad you didn’t read other comments before and get swayed in your opinion! I do agree that the different social media sites have different tones and audiences, especially for me! I like the separation of accounts for business vs a personal person from the company but I don’t need separate accounts right now because I do keep my Twitter 90% professional. I try to keep my Facebook as clean as possible so people don’t see me as “careless” or anything! I’m trying to keep that positive image up!
      Thank you so much for your comment and input!

  14. I love your blog lots of useful information. I’ve added it to my favorite bookmarks and subscribed in a reader. All these issues are important, and that’s why I just started blogging a while ago and it feels great.

  15. I love your blog lots of useful information. I’ve added it to my favorite bookmarks and subscribed in a reader. All these issues are important, and that’s why I just started blogging a while ago and it feels great.

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